Cookie Information: To help us make this website better, the cookie settings are set to 'allow all cookies'. If you continue without changing these settings, you consent to this - for more information and to change this at any time, see our privacy policy.   
Weather

Weather  |  Tide Tables

 

Home » About Us » Site Map

Site Map

Page Description Keywords (ALL)
Bats and Planning Bat populations have declined drastically in recent years, many of our bats are under threat and several are very rare. This decline is due to a range of factors including loss of roosting sites and foraging habitat and the fragmentation of commuting routes. bats, species, surveys,

Himalayan balsam Himalayan balsam has become an invasive non-native species (INNS) in the UK and is most commonly found on riverbanks, waste ground, and damp areas, and can also thrive in many other habitats. Himalayan balsam tolerates low light levels and smothers other vegetation as it out-competes native plants, gradually impoverishing habitats. invasive, non-native, species, himalayan, balsam, inns, impatiens, glandulifera,

Invasive non-native species (INNS) Invasive non-native species (INNS) can outcompete native UK species, physically change ecosystems and damage property. Some, like Giant hogweed, can be extremely harmful to human health. invasive, inns, non-native, species, japanese, knotweed, himalayan, balsam, rhododendron, hogweed,

Japanese knotweed Japanese knotweed (fallopia japonica), a member of the dock family, is a tall, vigorous ornamental plant that escaped from cultivation in the late 1800s. invasive, non-native, species, japanese, knotweed,

Legislation and Responsibility Legislation regarding INNS is covered by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 listed on Schedule 9 subject to Section 14. It is an offence to plant or cause species listed in Schedule 9 to grow/escape in the wild. The responsibility for controlling INNS is with the landowner. inns, invasive, non-native, species secretariat, landowner, responsibility, legislation,

National Park Authority INNS Policy Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority (PCNPA) does not have a statutory duty to control INNS in the National Park. Its involvement in the control of INNS relates to its capacity as a landowner and its maintenance of public rights of way. Please note, the National Park Authority owns only 2% of the land area of the National Park. inns, invasive, non-native, speciesuthority, policy,

Planning and Ecology Planning and Ecology - information on what is required when submitting a planning applicaiton ecology, protected, species, habitat,

Protected Species A surprising number of unique species can be found in Pembrokeshire. Species commonly affected by planning applications in Pembrokeshire include species, bats, otters, dormouse,

Protected Species Within Europe, natural habitats are continuing to deteriorate and an increasing number of wild species are seriously threatened. Much of this is as a result of development and agricultural intensification. For information on minerals and waste have a look at the: protected, species,

Rhododendron ponticum Rhododendron ponticum is an evergreen, ornamental plant introduced to the UK by the Victorians in the late 18th Century. It became especially popular on country estates, providing ornamental value as well as cover for game birds. It is native through Asia into China, and also occurs in Spain, Portugal and Turkey. rhododendron, ponticum, rhododendron, invasive, non-native, species, inns,

Stitch in Time Information on the Stitch in Time project, which aims to tackle invasive non-native species (INNS) in the Gwaun Valley stitch, time, inns, invasive, non-native, species, gwaun, valley, balsam, knotweed, rhododendron,