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Environment Minister discovers the Pembrokeshire Coast’s Epic Shores

The Minister for Environment recently met the dedicated volunteers who help keep the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park special as she visited the area for the first time since her appointment.

Hannah Blythyn AM also met National Park Authority staff on a whistle-stop tour of North Pembrokeshire, which included a visit to Castell Henllys Iron Age Village, Pentre Ifan Burial Chamber and a walk on the Pembrokeshire Coast National Trail near Ceibwr.

Minister for Environment, Hannah Blythyn AM met staff and volunteers from the National Park Authority’s Pathways project, which is funded by the Welsh Government.
Minister for Environment, Hannah Blythyn AM met staff and volunteers from the National Park Authority’s Pathways project, which is funded by the Welsh Government.

National Park Authority Chair, Gwyneth Hayward said: “It was a pleasure to welcome the Minister to the Pembrokeshire Coast to demonstrate the vital support that our committed volunteers provide to Park Authority staff.

“As 2018 is the Year of the Sea, it was also an opportunity to introduce the Minister to the National Park’s stunning and varied landscape and illustrate the various ways the Authority works to maintain the delicate balance between conservation and recreation, as well as supporting the local economy and communities.”

At Castell Henllys, the Minster met volunteers from the Welsh Government-funded Pathways project, a three-year scheme which aims to help more people spend time in the outdoors by providing volunteering, learning and training opportunities in the National Park and nearby areas.

The Pathways volunteers were carrying out tasks such as installing bird boxes and hedgelaying as part of an annual volunteer day. They were joined by the National Park Authority Voluntary Wardens, who can usually be found completing practical jobs alongside their local Ranger or providing support for activities and events.

The Minister also had an opportunity to get involved with the Changing Coasts crowdsourcing photography project, which invites people to send in their images of specific locations to help the Park Authority monitor the changes caused by the elements.

Pictured at Pentre Ifan with Hannah Blythyn AM (centre) are (from left to right) Park Authority Community Archaeologist, Delun Gibby; Chair, Gwyneth Hayward; Director of Park Direction and Planning, Jane Gibson and Chief Executive, Tegryn Jones.
Pictured at Pentre Ifan with Hannah Blythyn AM (centre) are (from left to right) Park Authority Community Archaeologist, Delun Gibby; Chair, Gwyneth Hayward; Director of Park Direction and Planning, Jane Gibson and Chief Executive, Tegryn Jones.

Hannah Blythyn AM, added: “I thoroughly enjoyed my visit to Ceibwr Bay and the chance to experience for myself part of the iconic National Trail and Castell Henllys, which are, without doubt two of the jewels in the National Park’s crown.

“It was a particular pleasure to meet Park Authority staff and volunteers who work hard day in, day out on a diverse range of important work. This includes the study and mitigation of the effects of climate change, as well as the promotion of outdoor recreation through volunteer, learning and training opportunities.

“I am grateful for all of their hard work, commitment and creativity to make the National Park such a special place.”

Published 26 January 2018


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